Boy wearing glasses

Half of Global Population will Require Specs by 2050

When it comes to that old favourite, Marmite it tends to split individuals. Some either love it or hate it. However, are you a glasses half full or empty kinda person?

Never mind about seeing the world through rose tinted spectacles, check this out for size. It seems that in less than four decades, half the people on the planet will need eyewear. Now that’s a real eye opener if ever there was one.

According to recent reports, 2050 is the key date, or so the scientists predict. Of course, this is ultimately down to a number of different factors such as staring at a laptop or computer screen. More and more of us are literally chained to our desks in a bid to meet that final deadline.

Therefore, it really is no surprise that our eyes can suffer from a host issues including eye strain. You are putting your retina through an excruciating workout as we focus on that last minute task.

But, did you know that staring for long periods is doing more harm than good? Having your eyes fixed on that Excel spreadsheet or Powerpoint presentation is as common as retweeting. Inevitably, this leads to some boffins christening this particular strain as CVS.

Computer Vision Syndrome is real folks and it’s happening at work desks and offices around the world. CVS affects more than half of those who rely on a computer screen on a daily basis. Ouch!

Advanced technology may be changing our eyesight

Eye trouble is without doubt on the rise, especially among working adults. Smartphone usage is another important aspect to take into consideration and is worse when lighting is a problem. In this case, your eye muscles have to work even harder than a triathlon athlete.

When you also take screen glare and flickering into consideration, CVS is extremely challenging especially for those people who have nearsightedness or astigmatism.

The boffins in the lab are no Nostradamus but they do have point, leading them to send out a stern warning to protect our peepers. Short sightedness could have a genuine effect by 2050, with scientists forecasting at least 10 per cent would experience severe myopia.

So what exactly is myopia? Often described as nearsightedness, it is becoming more and more prevalent. Eye fatigue from heavy computer usage could lead to a severe case of myopia. On the other hand, you may experience other symptoms from squinting to persistent headaches.

Among environmental factors, so-called high pressure educational systems, especially at very young ages in countries such as Singapore, Korea, Taiwan, and China, may be a causative lifestyle change, as may the excessive use of near electronic devices.

Proclaimed researchers from Brien Holden Vision Institute based in Sydney, Australia.

In addition to this, 90 per cent of teens, not to mention youngsters in China, suffer from short sightedness. Figures from South Korea reveal startling statistics where less than 4 per cent of men aged 19 can see clearly.

Europe does not fare better either with half of young adults suffering from myopia. If this really is the way of the future, rest assured you won’t need to spend a bomb on eyewear with SelectSpecs, with many prescription glasses starting from £10, which includes free lenses and coatings.

Simon (SelectSpecs)

Simon Lazarus is an experienced copywriter, PR/Business Consultant with a number of clients across different territories. This includes the US, Canada, China and the Middle East. Currently, his extensive portfolio includes writing engaging content, sharp marketing material, blogs and articles for a host of sites on diverse topics. This features food and drink, travel, business, luxury, personal finance, news, sport, technology, health, education and more. He also advises businesses on strategies, ROI and marketing across different sectors especially in the hospitality industry. Through online platforms and websites, Simon's portfolio of articles have amassed more than 5 million views to date.

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